Tooth Whitening vs Tooth Bleaching – What You Need to Know

Tooth Whitening vs Tooth Bleaching - What You Need to Know top image

Your teeth may be stained because of:

  • The aging process
  • stains from coffee, tea, soda, smoking or chewing tobacco
  • tartar and plaque build-up
  • trauma to the teeth that can cause discoloration.

Whatever the reason, tooth whitening or bleaching is among the most typical treatments to recover or attain that dream smile you’ve always desired.

Tooth Whitening vs Tooth Bleaching – What’s the Difference?

Tooth whitening is usually done using readily available whitening products such as whitening toothpastes and results in making teeth a couple of shades lighter. On the other hand, tooth bleaching utilizes either hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide (which is 1/3 as strong as hydrogen peroxide) and can make teeth three to eight shades lighter. For either of these approaches, we have the following options:

  • Whitening toothpastes have moderate abrasives that assist in removing discolorations. Nevertheless, they do not consist of any kind of bleaching agents.
  • Whitening strips and also gels are peroxide-based, as well as are put directly on your teeth.
  • Whitening mouthwash products add peroxide-based agents to the standard mouthwash formula.
  • Tray-based tooth whiteners resemble mouth guards that have a peroxide-based gel lightening solution which are put on for a few hours throughout the day, or may be worn while sleeping.
  • In-office tooth bleaching requires a visit to the dentist office to perform the procedure. Bleaching agents are applied directly to the teeth, and heat, light or lasers are used to aid the bleaching process. A treatment takes 30-60 minutes, and may require multiple visits to the dentist to achieve the full effect, which can make it expensive. At Arbor View Dental in Roseville, we utilize the Zoom whitening system.

Tooth Whitening Precautions

Tooth whitening should not be undertaken by children age 16 or below, pregnant or lactating females, and people with sensitive teeth or allergies. Tooth whitening is also not recommended for people with gum disease, worn enamel, exposed roots, and previous tooth repairs (such as fillings, crowns, and so on).

If you experience tooth sensitivity after a home or in-office whitening procedure, give your teeth a break by using toothpaste for sensitive teeth, or get in with the staff at Arbor View for a personal recommendation.

Last but not least, always remember to inspect to see if your chosen bleaching kit has been approved by the American Dental Association to guarantee that it is safe to use.